Why we shouldn’t cry over missed opportunities.

Our willingness to let go of missed opportunities impacts our capacity to continue taking effective action towards our goals. I recently felt myself crying over spilled milk as I regretted not increasing my activity on this WordPress blog months ago. Forecasting the forgone benefits of my oversight immediately diminished my initial enthusiasm to begin utilizing this site as my primary means of sharing inspirations and content. Though, I was able to redirect my attention to my anticipated vision for this blog, my initial emotional distress was a good reminder that fixating on the past is a significant deterrent to moving forward on our goals.

Forgive yourself.
Being hard on ourselves is generally an automatic reaction to one’s oversight. It can be difficult to forgive ourselves if we believe that we will not be presented with similar opportunities again or encounter another opportunity to redeem ourselves. Yet, being self critical undermines our confidence in ourselves, which then prevents us from trusting our judgment in subsequent occasions. Rather, forgiving ourselves consciously discards our prior limiting and critical perception of our competence. This enables us to acknowledge our potential to make different choices under similar circumstances. More so, forgiving our mishaps conditions our capacity to embrace inner peace and self worth amidst undesirable circumstances, which bolsters our trust and believe in our resolve and resiliency. The next time you regret forgoing a brief opportunity to greet someone you haven’t seen in a while or you get a question wrong on an exam because you second guessed your knowledge, you should immediately forgive yourself. This will actually enable you to trust your ability to take your preferred actions in subsequent instances.

Commit to the next opportunity.
It became easier to overcome my regret of lost productivity once I became fully committed to what I was going to do differently going forward. Instead of feeling deflated about a missed opportunities, identify your next desired outcome and invest your energy into planning your subsequent action steps. I moved past my initial disappointment by brainstorming the layout changes I wanted to make to my page, planning future posts and becoming more knowledgeable about certain features about my site. This restored my excitement and focus on being engaged in the priorities of the present moment. It was a sharp contrast from my prior response to routine oversights, whereby I can recall how the demotivation from mulling over questions that I accidentally got wrong on university exams distracted me effectively studying for upcoming tests. Being fully engaged on the tasks at hand sustains our passion, which is an important aspect of progress. In contrast one may overlook  the next best opportunity to redeem their desired outcome if they don’t focus on available opportunities.  I’ve often been distracted in my social encounters as I scrutinized  what I could have done differently in a previous interaction and missed the opportunity to engage in the very manner that I regretted not doing.

Our ability to utilize any success principle while pursuing our broader goals requires consistently incorporating these ideals into our every day routine interactions. Life is only ever unfolding in the present moment, thus our greatest oversight in life is minimizing the broader implications of our actions during each moment. Practice quickly moving past your slip ups in the every day moments such ignoring a hunch to bring an umbrella when the forecast changes to rain. Doing so conditions your capacity to remain forward thinking during more important occasions in your  life. Many people haven’t yet discovered that the key to realizing their human potential is as simple as becoming more conscious and intentional during their moment to moment interactions and choices.

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